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Knowing the Score

























































Attack of the Clones now has a musical score. John Williams composed and conducted the stirring symphonic music recorded in Abbey Studios by the London Symphony Orchestra.

Overseeing the scoring alongside Director George Lucas was Producer Rick McCallum. "It went very, very well -- effortlessly, as it always does with John. Hearing a musical score for the first time is one of the most wonderful events that can happen to you. Obviously, John hears the music when he's writing it, but no one gets the opportunity to fully experience it until then. Even though you may have heard little melodies on the piano, it never has the same impact unless you can really read music well to understand it."

The London Symphony Orchestra included 110 players per day, plus a one-day appearance by a full choir. About a dozen people behind the scenes -- music editor, music mixers and engineers -- were there to capture the music for its addition to the film.

"There's a massive amount of music, over 125 minutes worth," says McCallum. "That's a lot for a film; the average film has probably about 40. George made maybe five or six changes with certain cues that he wanted a little bit more intensity put in, or less. That was very easily done, especially with someone as talented as John is and as well as with music editor Ken Wannberg."

The Williams Star Wars leitmotif style is present, with key melodies denoting characters and relationships. Certain themes from Episode I will reappear, while others from the original trilogy will begin to be foreshadowed.

"It really is an arc, now, and the music brings in all the films together," says McCallum. "The major themes that will come in the series start in Episode I, build in Episode II, become more refined in Episode III, and then are there for IV, V and VI. One of the first new things that came up was the love theme, and thematically, it's beautifully structured, it's really interesting, and has really wonderful moments that preview what is about to come in terms of character development."